Easy Leek Quiche

P1070120_lznSince living in France, quiche has been one of my favorite. That buttery dough with a creamy filling…don’t even get me started. Well, apparently some of my friends here like it too (I made it for my birthday the last time), among them my leek-loving friend (the one I made the Soup with). Honestly, I tried my best to make a different kind (“I have spinach, we could make spinach and feta”). But since she was doing groceries there was just simply nothing I could do.

And I didn’t mind that much, after all, because who can say no to quiche? Apart from cutting and washing leek, whisking up some egg and creme fraiche, there is nothing you have to do. Yup nothing. Not even making dough, because we are being lazy efficient and use pre-made pastry dough. P1070107_lzn

And you don’t even need a quiche pan, a simple springform pan will be enough. While it bakes, just sit back, relax and enjoy the time with your friends and in no time, a delicious and hot dish will be one the table that will wow everyone – picky eaters included.
My friend took half the quiche home for her boyfriend and he ate it all. In one sitting. Even though he had already had dinner. Can you want any more?

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With love from the student kitchen,
Johanna

Easy Leek Quiche

  • Servings: 4
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This is what you need:
1 package (frozen) pastry dough (either the squares or a large sheet)
1 leek
200g creme fraiche (one pot)
4 eggs
One handful Gruyère (strong french cheese) plus some extra for on top
salt
pepper
A little Butter (to grease the pan)

And this is how we do it
1. If frozen, let the dough thaw.
2. Slice your leek first lengthwise (into to halves) and then into thin rings.
3. Wash the leek and let drain in a coleander
4. In the meantime, whisk together eggs and creme fraiche. Stir in the cheese and season with salt and pepper (you really want to season it well)
5. Stir in the leeks.
6. Preheat the oven to 200°C/ 390°F
7. Grease your pan with butter. Line with the pastry dough (you really want to make sure the bottom and sides are covered, cut them to fit if necessary and dab the borders a bit with your fingers to make everything stick together.
8. Bake in the oven for ca. 30-35 minutes (depending on the height of the quiche, if it’s higher it can take up to 45 minutes). When it looks like it’s done (the egg mixture is set, light brown on top), sprinkle some more cheese on and bake for another minute or until the cheese is melted.
9. Enjoy slightly warm.

Leftover quiche keeps in an airtight container in the fridge for about 3 days, it’s also good when eaten cold.

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Spinach Tomato Omlette

P1060979_lznI love spinach. People say that kids hate it (the colour, the flavor, I get it), but I’ve always loved it. My mom makes it simple with butter and some garlic (which is the best) while my grandma completely cooks it down (which a lot of people hate strongly dislike, but I guess that’s just how she learned it and I like it too, so not complaining).
The problem with buying a package of spinach here is that it comes in HUGE packs. Like 500g packs. And while spinach wilts down quite fast to nothing, I do tend to live off such a package for a few days (in many varieties).

Thus, voila, an easy but tasty spinach and tomato omelette, ready to be on your plate in 10 minutes maximum.Eat this for breakfast to ensure you’ve already gotten some of your 5 a day or as a quick and easy summer lunch. Adding in some grated emmental cheese won’t hurt either.P1060972_lzn
First, slice your cherry tomatoes in halves/quarters and heat them up with a little butter, then add in your spinach, wait till it wilts down (if there is too much excess moisture you might want to spill that into the sink!).
P1060974_lznIt might look like a lot, but it will wilt down quickly. Then pour the egg mixture over it and let it set for a few minutes (you can check with the spatula underneath if it’s done enough to flip, but usually you need to wait till the top is almost set).
Flip it, let brown on the other side for a minute or two and tadaa, you are done. Fast, wasn’t it?
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Do you consider omelette a breakfast or dinner food?

With love from the student kitchen,
Johanna

Spinach Tomato Omlette

  • Servings: 1
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This is what you need
2 eggs, preferably organic
2 handfuls of spinach, washed and drained off excess water
8 cherry tomatoes
salt
pepper
a bit of butter/oil for frying (although I prefer the butter taste)

And this is how we do it
1. Quarter the tomatoes. On medium high heat, fry them with the oil in the pan for 3 minutes
2. Add in the spinach, stir with a spatula so it doesn’t burn while it wilts down
3. Crack the two eggs into an extra bowl, whisk them with a fork. Season with a pinch of salt and a sprinkle of pepper
4. Your veggies in the pan should be done. Try moving them to the center into a heap, then flatten out the heap a little to spread it out again.
5. Cover the veggies with the egg. The egg might run a little bit away from the veggies but you can scrape them back a little with the spatula. Let cook until they have set, checking occasionally with the spatula if you can lift them from underneath (should take about 3-4 minutes).
6. Once the egg is set, flip the whole thing over with the spatula. Let fry on the other side for 1-2 more minutes.
7. Transfer onto a plate and enjoy hot.

Just in case you might not be able to finish, it will keep covered in the fridge for a day. But try to avoid this in any case because re-heated scrambled egg is just, let’s say, not so great.

Leftover Rice Salad

P1060965_lznThis is so easy I wouldn’t even call it a recipe. Remember the Easy mediterranean pasta salad I once made? If carb salads are a family, than these would be distant cousins. Okay, it’s not mediterranean but more triple red-orange (cousins, remember) and it’s the perfect way to use up that leftover rice in your fridge for a quick and light university lunch. Light enough to not consume too much energy for digestion but still filling and satisfying, what more can you want? To be honest, it’s really not special, but sometimes beauty just lies in the simple (and fast but not fast-foody) things.P1060961_lzn

Simply mix the rice with the vinaigrette (preferably over night but if you know that you’ll have a few hours until lunch that will do enough to get it infused with the flavor) and layer the veggies on top (that will prevent them from getting soggy). If using mushrooms, frying them in a little butter until just soft adds a little 5-min. gourmet touch to your dish (and makes lunch something to look out for). Alrighty, gotta go back to studying, that’s why this post  is short!P1060967_lzn

What is your favorite carb salad cousin?
With love from the student kitchen
Johanna

Leftover Rice Salad

  • Servings: 1
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This is what you need
1.5 cups rice, already cooked
2 tablespoons vinaigrette
5 cherry tomatoes
1/2 red bell pepper
5 mushrooms
A little butter
Salt

And this is how we do it
1. The night before /in the morning mix the rice with the vinaigrette
2. Quarter the  tomatoes and dice the bell pepper, layer on top of the rice
3. Cut the mushrooms into thin slices. Melt butter in a pan and fry the mushrooms until golden brown and tender. Season with salt
4. Let cool down and add to the other veggies
5. Wait for a few hours in order for the rice to infuse and enjoy as a light but flavorful uni lunch

This is my own recipe. Please do not use it commercially without my permission. When using it on your blog, please re-write it in your own words and link it to the source to give proper credit:). Thanks!

 

 

Leek and Cheese Soup (Examtime style)

P1060927_lznLeek soup is one of my favorite. Actually, almost every time my friend E and I got together we would try and make the perfect “leek and something” soup and we failed every time. Sometimes it was too much potato (because they had to go) or the carrots were overpowering (same reason) but once we had the perfect mixture it was the best. Leek soup is one of those comfort foods where you don’t feel bad afterwards because what is in there to feel bad about? Just leeks, water, broth, salt, pepper, a little extra ingredient and if you want to get decadent half a tablespoon heavy cream and grated cheese. Yum. And it’s fast! Now, this is the cheat version (aka exam time style). Why? The “normal” leek soup is made on a flour-butter base to which then the rest is added. This takes some care and effort, although resulting in a nicer soup of course, but this exam style knockoff does the trick as well. Continue reading

It’s spring leftover salad

P1060698_lznThe weather here has maniac depressive tendencies at the moment. There is days where it rains twice in an hour and in-between you have to take off your jacket because you are too hot. Friday was one of those days where you just want to crawl under your covers because it was sooo cold. So, with some leftovers from my fridge I decided to make a spring salad to bring back that spring feeling. Continue reading

Mediterranean Tortilla Pizza

P1060512_lznThe other day my friend E came over at 17:30 (5:30 pm) for what we had planned to be “cook dinner and watch a movie”. Well, let’s just say we never got further than dinner and spend the rest of the evening vegging out in my room on the carpet, eating lots (and by that I mean lots) of junk food and discussing important things in life (exams, guys, E’s disgusting housemate, the upcoming vacation etc.).

Now, one could say that the dinner simply took us so long (or the cake I baked to take to my friend P’s Birthday, pics will follow soon), but that would be a lie.
Why? Because it’s way too easy and simple. Continue reading

Carrot cake oatmeal

P1060489_lznA little kids dream: Carrot cake for breakfast. Heavenly cinnamon smell paired with moist cake and sugary taste…and then mom forcing us to eat a good and healthy breakfast and we secretly thought: “and when I grow up, I’ll eat cake for breakfast every day”.
Now we’re all (somehow) grown up and old enough to decide what we eat for ourselves, but somehow a cake doesn’t last me that well through a morning of class (surprise, surprise, Mom 1 Johanna 0). Still, we can dream, right? Or just make our morningly oatmeal taste like cake. Continue reading